Sound + Genetics: Activating & Limiting Genetic Expression Using The Harmonic Series

Bodies are affected on multiple levels by the forces of nature, and one of those forces is sound. Sound waves are considered mechanical because they require a medium like air or water through which to travel. Sounds results from vibration in matter.

When you speak, that’s moving air through the vocal cords. The decision to speak, or thought energy, is electromagnetic. And it’s based on sensory input and input from the quantum field.

“Electromagnetic field is thought as dominant energy in purely motor and sensory inputs to our brain, whilst quantum field or energy is perceived as more influential in brain cognitions…Universe and brain are considered as two most complicated entities with obvious links that exist between them.”Zamzuri Idris¹

Sound is an expression of electromagnetic energy from the source electric field, “Q” in physics or “QF” for the quantum field.

Given this source connection, and sound’s important in other fields of study, it’s not surprising that recent scientific studies are at last concluding sound’s effectiveness in regenerative medicine. For example, the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology successfully differentiated stem cells using high frequency sound.²

This implies that genetic frequency tapping, as I like to call it, is possible. Here are a few more recently documented examples of the concept:

A Mathematical Model for Vibration Behavior Analysis of DNA and Using a Resonant Frequency of DNA for Genome Engineering

Playing the notes of DNA with light: extremely high frequency nanomechanical oscillations

Cells rockin’ in their DNA: Genes suppressed by sound stimulation

The first article and second articles state that the resonant frequencies are in the Gigahertz range, and furthermore that those frequencies depend on length of the strand, nucleotide sequence and molecular weight.

Hence the photo of Stanley Jordan finger-tapping — and he’s a great example as also a composer & tech developer (he created the original Power Mac startup sound!): I can’t but think of a guitar string as I read about sound and DNA, and what is the developing field of “sonogenetics,” named by Dr. Sreekanth Chalasani of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in California.

So how could the harmonic series come into play? I’m imagining that the harmonic series from acoustics / music, mathematics and electronics can help predict resonant DNA frequencies and what is “in tune,” and in effect playing DNA like an instrument of sorts.

Harmonics are multiples of a fundamental frequency, and the harmonic series extends to infinity.

The above photos illustrate fundamental and harmonics, as well as what happens when a particular note is plucked on stringed instrument. For conceptual purpose here, one can imagine that the DNA strand is the string. So, perhaps there could be an activating “pluck” or frequency, as well as a limiting one. Activating and limiting have crossover and thus cross reference in electronics and computing. A limiter is a circuit and can be part of a musical amplifier for example is for wave shaping, keeping a specified range of output.

The evolving understanding of DNA and genetics is cross-referential, including mechanistic and engineering viewpoints, as well as quantum and metaphysical. More on this to come.

End note: The multidimensional beauty of the grand design is astounding. Science, or studying life, can be a great creative, interpretive and spiritual endeavor.

“Unlock your brain & save your soul.” — Real McCoy (came up on the radio shuffle while I was typing)

1. Quantum Physics Perspective on Electromagnetic and Quantum Fields Inside the Brain | Zamzuri Idris | Malaysian Journal of Medical Science | Feb 2020 | https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7053547/#__ffn_sectitle

2. Short-Duration High Frequency MegaHertz-Order Nanomechanostimulation Drives Early and Persistent Osteogenic Differentiation in Mesenchymal Stem Cells | Lizebona August Ambattu, Amy Gelmi, Leslie Y. Yeo | Jan 2022 | https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/smll.202106823

Published by sarah ikerd

@sarah.ikerd / owner

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